Event announcement: ‘Reading Machines: Problems and Possibilities in Rare Book and Manuscript Conservation’

IPCG SPRING LECTURE

‘Reading Machines: Problems and Possibilities in Rare Book and Manuscript Conservation’

Speaker: Edward Cheese

Tuesday 22nd March 2016

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© Cambridge University

In this talk, Edward Cheese will discuss books and manuscripts as working objects, examining the history of binding and reflecting on the possibilities and problems of modern conservation principles in relation to mechanical function. He will draw on his experience of working in Cambridge libraries, both in College and Museum settings.

Edward Cheese is a specialist Rare Book and Manuscript Conservator working at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge.

Following postgraduate work in English and American poetry at the University of Durham, he trained in Book Conservation at West Dean College and moved to work in Cambridge. He was initially employed on the Parker-on-the-Web Digitisation Project at Corpus Christi College before being given a permanent position at the Cambridge Colleges’ Conservation Consortium, which he ran from 2012 to the end of 2015.

Edward joined the Department of Manuscripts and Printed Books in January 2015 as Conservator and Assistant Keeper. He is a Queen Elizabeth Craft Scholar.

The Grand Robing Room at Freemasons’ Hall
60 Great Queen Street
London WC2B 5AZ

Doors open at 6pm for a prompt start at 6.30pm
Refreshments will be available after the lecture

This event is open to all
Tickets (and waiting list) only through http://ipcglecture.eventbrite.com

Admission £10
Students (with ID) £5

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